5 Things That Burn Me Up About WordPress And Web Sites

I’m about to go to Red Alert!

These rants have been building up in me. It’s time to get them out for all the world to see.

After you read them, let me know (below) what you see all the time on the web that gets you hopping mad.

1. It’s “WordPress” Not “Wordpress”

I totally forgive – and unconditionally pardon – anyone new to the WP experience who gets this wrong. I probably was unaware of the harm my carelessness caused in my early WordPress days.

But if you’re a WP Vet and are still referring to “Wordpress,” you need to get it right.

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I’m about to go to Red Alert!

These rants have been building up in me. It’s time to get them out for all the world to see.

After you read them, let me know (below) what you see all the time on the web that gets you hopping mad.

1. It’s “WordPress” Not “WordPress”

I totally forgive – and unconditionally pardon – anyone new to the WP experience who gets this wrong. I probably was unaware of the harm my carelessness caused in my early WordPress days.

But if you’re a WP Vet and are still referring to “WordPress,” you need to get it right.

While I’m at it, if you ever use the WordPress logo make sure to use the right one.

The incorrect and correct version of the WordPress logo

Yeah, I got this wrong a way long time ago and was properly called out for it.

2. Using Your Gmail (Or Other Service) Address For Business Email

This one drives me nuts too. I’ve been ranting on this for years. I am admitting defeat. Run up the white flag.

If you have a business or organization site, a sign of professionalism is using your domain name in your email address. Something like sue@mydomain.com looks far better than sue637@gmail.com.

There is no excuse for this. You’ll say, “But I love my gmail account. It’s so easy to use.”

You can use your gmail account and route your domain email through it. That way you can still use gmail but no one will know that you are.

Here is how to configure your gmail account so you can use it with your domain email.

3. Using Canned Content For A Web Site Or Email Campaigns

If you can’t come up with original content, then don’t hire a company that spews out lots of articles that they sell to everyone – including your competitors.

I can smell canned content a mile away, so can you and so can Google. The idea of paying for content that is used over and over again stinks. It’s fake, not authentic, certainly not you, and most often it is low quality.

4. Making An Instructional Video Without Narration

thumbs donw

This one is a total non-starter. If I’m watching – as I frequently do – a video that has no narration, I’ll get off that video as fast as my fingers can click the mouse.

I realize that English is not everyone’s native tongue. Perhaps a video’s creator may feel that leaving out narration will make the video appeal to the largest possible audience.

Nothing is further from the truth.

First, it’s widely believed that narration will make or break a good instructional video. When I’m watching a professional video like that from lynda.com or wpapprentice.com, the audio quality and narration are super. When I’m watching videos on YouTube or elsewhere without narration, you can be sure I’m straining to learn what I need to know.

Second, creating videos without narration is an absolute no-no when it comes to creating accessible content. Someone with low vision may not see the video very well. That’s just the start. Accessible videos must have closed captioning. (I admit to dropping the ball on this.)

To top it off, videos with an annoying audio track usually earn the dreaded thumbs down.

5. Do Not Rely Upon Color Alone

This is one of the core principles of accessible web design. I break it far too often. I’m going to fix it for my new web site.

The most egregious of these faux pas is the removal of the underline in links and the use of a different color for the link text. While it may look nicer to have the underlining removed, it can be much harder to see for people with a vision impairment.

I ought to know.

5 thoughts on “5 Things That Burn Me Up About WordPress And Web Sites”

  1. Thanks, Bud! I appreciate reading quick tips like these; they’re a great supplement to the webinar I did with you via Editors Canada recently. I’m looking forward to using these strategies on my own site!

    Reply
    • Thank you Alicia for taking the series I recently did for Editors Canada. Hope that you will find a lot of very useful info here and in my WordPress Big 3 newsletter. Feel free to reach me via email too. bud@joyofwp.com

      Reply
  2. Hi Bud,

    Your rant on video without audio is the one that hit home for me. I’ll keep it in mind as we work to create new videos for our updated (in creation) site.

    My pet peeve is the current trend to use pale fonts and colors on websites. Like you, I have “vision challenges” and this trend drives me crazy! Your colors and fonts are one of the reasons I love your newsletter and site so much!

    Linda

    Reply
    • Linda – thank you again for your comments and feedback which are always appreciated and welcomed. Someone on Reddit said he hated narration for instructional videos. I told him if he didn’t like then just mute the video. I, for one, don’t understand how you can do an instructional video without narration. Makes no sense to me.

      Glad you like my site and my newsletter. Both will continue to have contrast in the art direction. At least I’ll be able to see it! ๐Ÿ™‚

      Reply
  3. Bud,

    Delighted to comment. I can never understand users who read something helpful and then don’t tell the writer that it helped them! Or even that they hated it. It’s lonely enough creating content,you don’t need it to drop into a communication vacuum. Does this count as a mini rant? ๐Ÿ™‚

    You and Kirk Biglione (and folks at StudioPress) are the best communicators I know. Please don’t stop!

    Reply

Leave a Comment

5 thoughts on “5 Things That Burn Me Up About WordPress And Web Sites”

  1. Thanks, Bud! I appreciate reading quick tips like these; they’re a great supplement to the webinar I did with you via Editors Canada recently. I’m looking forward to using these strategies on my own site!

    Reply
    • Thank you Alicia for taking the series I recently did for Editors Canada. Hope that you will find a lot of very useful info here and in my WordPress Big 3 newsletter. Feel free to reach me via email too. bud@joyofwp.com

      Reply
  2. Hi Bud,

    Your rant on video without audio is the one that hit home for me. I’ll keep it in mind as we work to create new videos for our updated (in creation) site.

    My pet peeve is the current trend to use pale fonts and colors on websites. Like you, I have “vision challenges” and this trend drives me crazy! Your colors and fonts are one of the reasons I love your newsletter and site so much!

    Linda

    Reply
    • Linda – thank you again for your comments and feedback which are always appreciated and welcomed. Someone on Reddit said he hated narration for instructional videos. I told him if he didn’t like then just mute the video. I, for one, don’t understand how you can do an instructional video without narration. Makes no sense to me.

      Glad you like my site and my newsletter. Both will continue to have contrast in the art direction. At least I’ll be able to see it! ๐Ÿ™‚

      Reply
  3. Bud,

    Delighted to comment. I can never understand users who read something helpful and then don’t tell the writer that it helped them! Or even that they hated it. It’s lonely enough creating content,you don’t need it to drop into a communication vacuum. Does this count as a mini rant? ๐Ÿ™‚

    You and Kirk Biglione (and folks at StudioPress) are the best communicators I know. Please don’t stop!

    Reply

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